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Max Becherer is a freelance photojournalist based in Cairo, Egypt, and covers Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan for Polaris Images. In 2003, he covered the Iraq invasion and since then has covered some of the key moments in Iraq’s history including the second battle of Fallujah, the battle to retake Samarra, and the2005 elections. His work has appeared in The New York Times, Time Magazine, Stern, U.S. News and World Report, Men’s Health, and Smithsonian among others.

One Comment

  1. hey max how’s it going!! Awesome blog that you have set up… I will be reading it now! hope all is going good with you man.. I would like to hear from you sometime…


4 Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. […] Photojournalist Max Becherer has been covering war-torn Iraq and Afghanistan since 2003, and his work has appeared in leading publications like TIME and the New York Times. His latest project, however, leaves war in the background; instead, he focuses on Afghanistan’s less-known emerald miners (and the communities around them). […]

  2. […] Photojournalist Max Becherer has been covering war-torn Iraq and Afghanistan since 2003, and his work has appeared in leading publications like TIME and the New York Times. His latest project, however, leaves war in the background; instead, he focuses on Afghanistan’s less-known emerald miners (and the communities around them). […]

  3. By Impulse || Home on 09 Dec 2015 at 4:55 am

    […] Photojournalist Max Becherer has been covering war-torn Iraq and Afghanistan since 2003, and his work has appeared in leading publications like TIME and the New York Times. His latest project, however, leaves war in the background; instead, he focuses on Afghanistan’s less-known emerald miners (and the communities around them). […]

  4. By Getting Out and About | Eslkevin's Blog on 16 Dec 2015 at 9:42 am

    […] Photojournalist Max Becherer has been covering war-torn Iraq and Afghanistan since 2003, and his work has appeared in leading publications like TIME and the New York Times. His latest project, however, leaves war in the background; instead, he focuses on Afghanistan’s less-known emerald miners (and the communities around them). […]

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